stitch resist

Art Partners: Brushes, and December tomatoes

Every drawing session reminds me of the importance of brushes. Depending on the surface used- fabric, slick paper, toothy paper or fabrics — different brushes perform differently and are a simple yet vital  part of the toolkit. And of course, those luscious orange colors of late Roma tomatoes from the garden, picked green and ripening slowly indoors. Handbuilt ceramic bowl by Eric Jensen.

Different brushes for different drawing tasks: line work, wash using Sumi ink brushes, and my portable watercolor brush.

35 years of textile samples, part 2: stitched & clamped resists

In the previous post, I described needing a storage container and finding myself immersed in sorting through a career’s worth of textile samples and explorations. Here is Part 2 of this archive, stitched and clamped resists on cotton and silk, using Procion MX dyes. This is a tradition more popularly known as tie dye, but it stems from a rich textile heritage that is very considered and carefully made.

Bound resist cotton, Procion MX dyes, by Astrid Hilger Bennett
Bound resist cotton, Procion MX dyes, by Astrid Hilger Bennett
Clamp resist cotton, Procion MX dyes, by Astrid Hilger Bennett
Bound resist silk, Procion MX dyes, by Astrid Hilger Bennett
Clamp resist on silk, Procion MX dyes, by Astrid Hilger Bennett
Clamp resist and silk resist on silk, Procion MX dyes, by Astrid Hilger Bennett
Stitch resist, silk

 

 

35 years of textile samples, part 3: stitch resist (shibori, tritik)

This is the third in a series of posts revisiting a treasure trove of textile samples made while learning new techniques. In search of a storage box, I found myself delving into forgotten experiments and exciting processes of learning. The other posts involved early screen prints and bound and clamp resists. These techniques have many names and fall under shibori and tritik.

So much fun! Stitch resist on silk dipped in an indigo vat, by Astrid Hilger Bennett. Unlike chemical dyes, which tend to wick up into the fiber, indigo stops the minute it perceives a barrier, such as a fold. The result is a clean, crisp pattern.
Indigo stitch resist on silk by Astrid Hilger Bennett, detail
Shibori stitch resist on silk using Procion MX dyes, by Astrid Hilger Bennett